Published during: January 2012

The World is Flat

If your computer crashes today, and you pick up your phone to call tech support, the chances are good you’ll hear an Indian voice on the other end. The computer was likely designed by a team of engineers in America, perhaps with collaboration in Europe, Japan, or Korea. The majority of its parts were probably manufactured in factories in China, Taiwan. It may have been assembled anywhere from Brazil to Biloxi.

The world is flat. Read on, intrepid explorer →

I’m currently reading The Book of the Dun Cow, by Walter Wangerin Jr.  This is an amazing book so far.

Incidentally, I just finished Friedman’s The World Is Flat, and I’m hoping to have a review up by later in the week.

I cannot help but think that if one cannot discern your view of the Godhead from your preaching, perhaps you are not preaching enough about God.

—Trevin Wax, “Grace and Truth Beyond the Elephant Room”, Kingdom People

ChristianMingle.com’s advertising… ugh. This, along with a smiling couple, was the entirety of the content of one of their ads:

Delight yourself in the Lord, and he will give you the desires of your heart. —Psalm 37:4.

There are so many things wrong with this. So many that I don’t even have words for it, at least at the moment. (That, and I need to get out the door if I’m going to finish my 13-mile run before dinner.) But there will be words on this one. Oh, yes.

What do you feel about…?

Sometimes, the questions we ask indicate as much about us as our response to the answers we receive. For example, I was discussing a controversial theological point with someone recently, and at one point in the conversation, she quite innocuously asked a question starting, “But do you feel that…”

The phrasing caught my attention. It is common enough, at least in the circles I run in. People often speak of what they feel to be true in a given area. In one sense, the phrase is harmless enough: people really mean, “This is what I believe.” In another sense, though, it should give us pause Read on, intrepid explorer →